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christilou

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Here is the third shot re-worked:

View attachment 103284

Enough, or knock it back more?
Sony green is one of my pet hates, I would change them altogether from electric to a more mellow shade myself! They are dressed in a lovely ethereal manner and the green really jars I think. Otherwise the subjects and the photos are lovely you've captured some great golden light :)
 

somnambulist_squirrel

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A little more If I may suggest. Also if you use lightroom, slide the Green Hue to the left a little to make the green a little warm to match the ambient. The tree trunk on picture nr. 1 and 2 are distracting.
Nice lovely pictures!
Is this moving more in the right direction? Moved the green hue more toward yellow, dropped saturation more, cooled the temp on the whole thing a little to compensate for the warming of the green tones. I certainly like it more....
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somnambulist_squirrel

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Much nicer, more natural looking. It's a difficult balance to get the skin tones right but you've done a great job I think. I struggle a lot with this.
I find that when I get into it, I keep fiddling more than I ought. I now try to take a break when I think I have it reasonably close, and come back later for a second look. I wonder if my sense of color gets skewed from working at it too long and the reality check helps? Sometimes, like here, I just need to get outside opinions to re-align my thinking. Thank goodness this is a hobby and not a commercial exercise for me, I don't know how I would justify the time... Kudos to you professionals out there! Then again, I am very much a beginner at this, so I'm sure it gets easier and faster with time and practice.
 

bdbits

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I think pro photographers find some settings they generally use (like say "less green") and make it part of a preset they apply up front. This can cut time quite a bit as long as you shoot consistently and the effect is one you pretty much always apply to the incoming images, or will apply to an entire batch of similar images e.g. from the same session.

I do think the later version is better looking. I will say though that editing depends on what you intend for the photos. For example, where I live, in June particularly, the grasslands and trees can naturally be a rather intense shade of green. Some people may think a photo I have taken has increased saturation over what is real (whether the camera did it or I did it in post). Possibly... but there are cases where that look actually matches the reality. So do I want to make it match reality, or more palatable for viewers? And the reverse scenario can also be true, where you increase saturation from what was capture. Or of course you may just leave it as captured. It's a choice one has to make to achieve the desired look.

I do find I will sometimes change the way I edit a photo over a period of days or even longer. Your editing environment - lighting, monitors, color calibration if any - can also affect your perception, e.g. some monitors will look warmer after 15-20 minutes if the power was off. Also if you are editing at night by artificial light versus in daylight. And your viewers will see your photos on all kinds of devices, and of course the perception of color itself can vary from person to person. Its a tricky business to be sure. In the end I think you have to find what works for you, and hope they see it the same.
 

somnambulist_squirrel

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I think pro photographers find some settings they generally use (like say "less green") and make it part of a preset they apply up front. This can cut time quite a bit as long as you shoot consistently and the effect is one you pretty much always apply to the incoming images, or will apply to an entire batch of similar images e.g. from the same session.

I do think the later version is better looking. I will say though that editing depends on what you intend for the photos. For example, where I live, in June particularly, the grasslands and trees can naturally be a rather intense shade of green. Some people may think a photo I have taken has increased saturation over what is real (whether the camera did it or I did it in post). Possibly... but there are cases where that look actually matches the reality. So do I want to make it match reality, or more palatable for viewers? And the reverse scenario can also be true, where you increase saturation from what was capture. Or of course you may just leave it as captured. It's a choice one has to make to achieve the desired look.

I do find I will sometimes change the way I edit a photo over a period of days or even longer. Your editing environment - lighting, monitors, color calibration if any - can also affect your perception, e.g. some monitors will look warmer after 15-20 minutes if the power was off. Also if you are editing at night by artificial light versus in daylight. And your viewers will see your photos on all kinds of devices, and of course the perception of color itself can vary from person to person. Its a tricky business to be sure. In the end I think you have to find what works for you, and hope they see it the same.
All good points. The greens of the natural environment here are, currently, quite electric. And, I think for this purpose, it makes sense to dial it back some, especially with what the kiddos were looking to achieve with their dress and their poses (the ideas were theirs, not mine - creative kids!). Your last point also makes sense to me, as my first pass at these was last night, in a mostly dark house on my laptop, which renders a bit dull.
 

fractal

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I think pro photographers find some settings they generally use (like say "less green") and make it part of a preset they apply up front. This can cut time quite a bit as long as you shoot consistently and the effect is one you pretty much always apply to the incoming images, or will apply to an entire batch of similar images e.g. from the same session.

I do think the later version is better looking. I will say though that editing depends on what you intend for the photos. For example, where I live, in June particularly, the grasslands and trees can naturally be a rather intense shade of green. Some people may think a photo I have taken has increased saturation over what is real (whether the camera did it or I did it in post). Possibly... but there are cases where that look actually matches the reality. So do I want to make it match reality, or more palatable for viewers? And the reverse scenario can also be true, where you increase saturation from what was capture. Or of course you may just leave it as captured. It's a choice one has to make to achieve the desired look.

I do find I will sometimes change the way I edit a photo over a period of days or even longer. Your editing environment - lighting, monitors, color calibration if any - can also affect your perception, e.g. some monitors will look warmer after 15-20 minutes if the power was off. Also if you are editing at night by artificial light versus in daylight. And your viewers will see your photos on all kinds of devices, and of course the perception of color itself can vary from person to person. Its a tricky business to be sure. In the end I think you have to find what works for you, and hope they see it the same.
When I shoot and edit portraits I want to make the subject stand out as much as possible. The background or "environment" should be secondary and not distracting. A landscape of course is different.
 

christilou

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I find that when I get into it, I keep fiddling more than I ought. I now try to take a break when I think I have it reasonably close, and come back later for a second look. I wonder if my sense of color gets skewed from working at it too long and the reality check helps? Sometimes, like here, I just need to get outside opinions to re-align my thinking. Thank goodness this is a hobby and not a commercial exercise for me, I don't know how I would justify the time... Kudos to you professionals out there! Then again, I am very much a beginner at this, so I'm sure it gets easier and faster with time and practice.

I know, I sometimes leave mine overnight and take a fresh look in daylight. I find working during the dark evening on my Mac, the colours look entirely different during daylight hours. Sometimes I will completely have to re do something! The pressures of being a pro does not bear thinking about although I guess they make more effort with consistency and batch edits.
 

sapoeijoek

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All good points. The greens of the natural environment here are, currently, quite electric. And, I think for this purpose, it makes sense to dial it back some, especially with what the kiddos were looking to achieve with their dress and their poses (the ideas were theirs, not mine - creative kids!). Your last point also makes sense to me, as my first pass at these was last night, in a mostly dark house on my laptop, which renders a bit dull.
For landscape shots, yes we should just leave the green saturation alone. I think high saturation green, and tinted green on portraits look terrible.
 
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christilou

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Lucy with the 55 1.8
 

ionian

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I'm not wild about these - I didn't choose the styling, and I can't quite get the skintone right with all that green - but here's a couple from a recent shoot as I haven't posyed anything in ages (I haven't photographed anything in ages!):

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